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Army Personnel, Civilians Collaborate to Reduce TBI Depression

In the past several months, we have covered the ongoing dispute between football players and the NFL over a link between head injuries, depression and suicide. This possible link does not just affect our athletes. The men and women in our armed forces suffer disproportionately from depression possibly brought on by traumatic brain injuries sustained in combat. The Army reports that 131 soldiers have died in potential suicides this year.

To combat this epidemic, mental health and military officials met at Fort Campbell, which sits on the border between Kentucky and Tennessee. Army officials said that input from local medical experts could help our men and women in uniform.

“We cannot do this alone on Fort Campbell,” said Col. Paul R. Cordts of Fort Campbell’s Blanchfield Army Community Hospital. “We depend on the community and we need your help in addressing these issues, especially around our mental health services.”

Soldiers returning from combat face several psychological issues as they attempt to reintegrate themselves into the community, such as post-traumatic stress disorder and symptoms related to brain injuries. Since 2000, more than 253,000 soldiers have sustained traumatic brain injuries.

We applaud this joint effort between Fort Campbell and the local mental health professionals. Our armed service members deserve the best treatment and respect when they return home, and we hope this collaboration leads to stronger mental health for our veterans.

If you know someone who suffered a traumatic brain injury, we would like to hear from you. You have options for seeking justice against injuries caused by negligence and wrongdoing. Call today at (615) 690-2080 and ask about our free consultations.

“And my God will supply every need of yours according to his riches in glory in Christ Jesus.” – Philippians 4:19

The Law Office of Stanley A. DavisNashville injury attorney

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