Step-by-Step: What to Do After a Motorcycle Accident

Photo of a motorcycle under a carEven low speed accidents can cause significant injury to motorcycle riders. Victims often suffer lacerations, friction burns, broken bones and potentially catastrophic injuries, like traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury. For motorcyclists struck by other vehicles, it is possible to bring a negligence claim against drivers who cause motorcycle accident injuries.

Steps to Take After a Motorcycle Accident

Here’s what you should do if you suffer motorcycle accident injuries:

  1. Seek medical attention. Even if your injuries are not serious on the outside, motorcycle accidents can cause delayed onset injuries, such as concussion, that are important to identify and treat early. Additionally, the medical documentation you receive will be valuable in proving your injuries.
  2. If you are able, interview witnesses to the accident. Other drivers who stop to help or bystanders who saw the accident could provide valuable insight for police and for the courts.
  3. Take photographs of the crash site as well as your injuries. You should document all aspects of the accident scene, including the positioning of the vehicles, the damage on each vehicle and your injuries.
  4. Notify the Tennessee Department of Safety regarding your injuries. This is a required step for all accidents involving personal injury, death or property damage exceeding $50 (so, most accidents).
  5. Do not, under any circumstances, give a statement to the opposing party’s insurance company. Instead, refer them to your legal representative.

Matthew 5:43-45, “But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven. For he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust.”



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